• On Making Research Public

    —invited guest lecture in the Ph.D. Seminar at EnsadLAb / Ecole nationale supérieure des Arts décoratifs, Paris

    This year's Ph.D. seminar is focused on strategies of “publication." Here, the main guiding questions are how to make research (in art and design) public? And how can media such as the book, the library, and the exhibition be mobilized as research tools in this process?

  • World as Forest

    —a week's seminar with B.A. students at the Institut Kunst, Hochschule für Gestaltung und Kunst, Basel

    Using the new intercalations publication, The Word for World is Still Forest, as a starting point, my second seminar at Institut Kunst in Basel will combine readings and discussions with excursions behind the scenes of the city's Tropenhaus of the Botanical Gardens, the Museum der Kulturen, and the Natural History Museum. Traversing through the archives of institutions that collect natural and cultural material—books, artworks, artifacts, and scientific specimens—we will reflect on how these institutions organize what is considered knowledge and explore strategies and practices with which we can activate and connect these spaces in ways in which they are not normally viewed by dominant, colonial cultures. The seminar is an introduction to applied critical thinking with a focus on more-than-human entanglements and ecological urgencies of our times.

  • Shapeshifting Fact & Fiction

    —a week's workshop with B.A. students at the Institut Kunst, Hochschule für Gestaltung und Kunst, Basel

    This workshop will unfold through a series of traversals through the archives of institutions that collect cultural material—books, artworks, artifacts, and scientific specimens. We will understand how these institutions organize what is considered knowledge and explore strategies and practices with which we can activate and connect these spaces in ways in which they are not normally viewed by dominant, colonial cultures. In this process, we will critically interrogate books, exhibitions, archives, and collections, attending to how they record and disseminate knowledge, experimenting along the way with cross-overs, shape-shifting, fact and fiction.

  • Entangled Legacies: Institutional Collections & Curatorial-Editorial Agency

    —a weekly postgraduate seminar at the New Centre for Research & Practice, thenewcentre.org

    With regards to the meaning of collecting, collections, and curatorial practice, classes will consist of readings, lectures, and discussions about thematic and visual strategies. An introductory contextualization to the history of exhibitions is provided through excerpted readings of seminal texts. We ask: What does the Anthropocene thesis imply for museums and the collections they contain? How do environmental and geopolitical concerns transform traditional exhibition practice? And, what is the potential of curatorial-editorial agency for alternative forms of collecting and presenting in the Anthropocene? The goal is to examine such exhibition and publication projects that have confronted the entangled legacies of institutional collections in order to illuminate and compare how exhibitions communicate different concerns through a variety of media presented in spatial constellations.

  • Running with Concepts: The Geologic Edition

    —invited mentorship & lecture in the two-day postgraduate workshop organized by Christine Shaw, Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto, Canada

    Offering a curatorial perspective on the Anthropocene, Anna-Sophie Springer's presentation "A Palimpsest of Species & Spaces" takes its point of departure from the juxtaposition of two drawings. First, the German explorer Alexander von Humboldt's panoramic map of the Andes, from 1851, showing a set of steep mountains covered with strata of different types of green forest, rock, and ice; second, American artist Mark Dion's colour pencil work Anthropocene Monument, from 2014, with its compacted pylon of mineral and fossil resources and anthropogenic soil. While the former image is one of the earliest modern cartographic representations of geology and botany as understood in relation to geography and climatic zones, rendering visible for Western science nature as a complex system, the latter schematically depicts the long-term impact of a single species—our own—within the geological subsoil of the planet. Arguing that current matters in natural history are more messy than either of these layered images seems to suggest, Springer will discuss her current research and previous exhibitions and publications which have engaged a complex spectrum of species and spaces to create possible affective and conceptual affinities beyond representation, provoking instead new concepts for increasingly turbulent times.

  • Advanced Readings in Curatorial Studies (VIS 3002H)

    —in the Visual Studies Master's program, at the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto